User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

by 

Working construction is a hot, sweaty business, with lots of time spent outdoors, without air conditioning, and in direct sunlight. Plus there’s all that site-safe clothing and PPE—essential parts of the outfit, but not always the coolest. And things are of course at their worst during the summer. The risks of sunburns, dehydration, heat exhaustion, and heatstroke are very real, and skin cancer is another long-term concern.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

by  Thomas J. Bukowski

The National Safety Council conducts routine ergonomics assessments of NSC office workstations – including those of remote workers. The following pictorial, featuring NSC employees, depicts an abbreviated ergonomics assessment that can be conducted at a typical office workstation. As with all aspects of ergonomics, no “one-size-fits-all” body position or arrangement of items exists – worker needs may differ from what is shown.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

by Dennis Carnrike 

Few people have the ability to remember something they’ve only been told once. This is especially true if you’re competing with continuously changing priorities and a ton of distraction—at work, at home and on the road. To help workers better retain safety lessons you will need to use several tactics inside and outside of the classroom. Here are four steps to build a framework for better knowledge retention.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

by TJ Scimone

We've all been there. Sitting at a mandatory meeting counting the minutes until we can go for a lunch break, or at least get back to some "real work". However, as a safety manager, you know that employee safety is real work. If anything, your safety presentations and meetings could save lives. But public speaking, especially to an audience who'd rather be anywhere else, isn't the easiest part of your job. Follow these tips to engage your employees and put safe work practices front and center in their minds.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

No single task touches on so many facets of safety as welding. Among the issues are fire safety, electric shock, compressed gases, toxic fumes, and personal protection for the eyes, hands, feet, and body. Above all else, caution is crucial when it comes to welding because the risks of personal injury from any mistake are high. This article should serve as a primer for welding safety.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Terry L. Mathis

Have you heard organizations assert that safety is their top priority, safety is job one, safety is never compromised for production, etc.? Such slogans and platitudes, however well intentioned, can inflict subtle harm to safety efforts. Unless the details of the organization’s priorities and values are very clearly explained, these assertions about the importance of safety tend to perpetuate a dichotomy between safety and productivity.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

by Fred Hosier

A recent survey shows which workers are more likely to sleep while on the job, including four safety-sensitive industries. 

Amerisleep polled 1,001 people about sleeping at work.

Here’s the breakdown for four safety-sensitive industries:

  • construction: 68.2%
  • manufacturing: 52.6%
  • transportation and warehousing: 52.6%, and
  • medical and health care: 52.1%.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

article by Eric Glass

In order to be a successful HSE professional, you MUST be a strategic leader and thinker. Having these characteristics gets you recognized and heard. These abilities are a talent, but like any talent, the more you practice and perfect it, the better you will become.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

You know that a safe workplace is a productive and successful workplace. In most cases, creating a culture of safety and implementing the standards and practices to ensure a secure work environment isn’t something you can do on your own. RUANSA can take that burden off your shoulders, ensuring your workplace is safe so you can focus on other areas.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active
Posted on  by 

Every construction site includes at least a few pieces of heavy equipment. While this machinery is essential to productivity on projects, it’s also one of the main sources of danger to workers in an around the equipment. In particular, it contributes to lots of caught-between/caught-in hazards and struck-by hazards. This is why it’s important that everyone—from top management to site supervisors to all crew members—be familiar with best practices and top safety tips for working around heavy equipment.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

by Tinus Boshoff

For the purpose of this article we will focus on three types of risk assessments:

 

  • Baseline risk assessments (Baseline HIRA)
  • Issue based risk assessments (Issue based HIRA)
  • Continues risk assessments (Continues HIRA)

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

by ccohs

What is workplace bullying?

Bullying is usually seen as acts or verbal comments that could 'mentally' hurt or isolate a person in the workplace. Sometimes, bullying can involve negative physical contact as well. Bullying usually involves repeated incidents or a pattern of behaviour that is intended to intimidate, offend, degrade or humiliate a particular person or group of people. It has also been described as the assertion of power through aggression.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Work-related hand injuries are one of the main reasons workers end up in the emergency room. Whether it’s damage to the nerves in your fingers and hands, losing a finger, a burn to the skin or an allergic reaction, injury to your hands can negatively impact the quality of your work and your ability to be productive. Worst case scenario, it can end your career and detract from your overall quality of life.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

article by BSI

ISO 45001 was created to address the global need to improve work related health and safety of workers – over two million of whom die each year from work-related incidents and an even higher number from occupational health issues. Led by the UK, the new international standard was developed with input from over 70 countries across five continents.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

by Cheri Genereaux

When it comes to safety, a lot of attention is dedicated to the biggest or loudest hazards. But if you poll folks in the construction industry on the source of most injuries, you’ll find that they’re rarely caused by the scariest tasks. Most often, they’re the result of all the little hazards that workers navigate on a daily basis. Every year I speak with over 800 site managers, safety supervisors, trainers and other construction industry representatives and by far the most common complaint I hear is about workers making “stupid” mistakes—things like forgetting to wear PPE, not following a procedure that’s been drilled into their head, jumping down from a tailgate, or muscling heavy material or machines.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active
by Phil La Duke

Safety isn’t always foremost in the minds of entrepreneurs or small business owners. For some, a severe injury to a worker is a very remote possibility and hardly worth worrying about. Still others believe there is no way to get the job done safely without spending heaps of money that they just don’t have. Yet small businesses sometimes discover the hard way that it doesn’t take many injuries to put a company in real financial peril. The belief that a business must choose between workplace safety and making a profit is a very old and deeply held mind-set. Unfortunately it’s usually just plain wrong. Here are seven approaches that any business owner can adopt to reduce the risk of worker injuries without adding prohibitive cost;


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

by James E. Leemann Ph.D.

The origins of behavior-based safety (BBS) are attributed to a number of different individuals in the fields of behavior analysis, organizational behavior, psychology, safety, and so on.  Regardless of who you attribute the beginnings of BBS to, most would agree the origins of applied BBS came into fruition in the mid- to late 1970s. So for more than three decades companies have been applying BBS with varying degrees of success and failure.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

by Crystal Vogt

As a store owner, you know it's important to ensure that your retail space is safe for both customers to shop and employees to work. There are a variety of ways a workplace can become unsafe, including inattention to detail or inconsistent floor checks, that may lead to injury or illness. While the Occupational Safety and Health Act has safety recommendations for workplaces, your retail store is only as safe as you keep it. There are a variety of factors to keep in mind when evaluating the safety of your store.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

The incoming inspection with a new tenant forms the foundation of the relationship between landlord, tenant and agent. It’s not just about making sure everyone knows what is damaged but also about making sure that all parties are on the same page regarding rules and expectations for the rental period. It also goes a long way in establishing a level of trust.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

by Lauretta Claussen

It's fairly obvious that safety and health hazards can exist on worksites filled with heavy machinery and equipment, where employees often are required to engage in strenuous manual labor. A job where most of the work tasks are completed while sitting in a chair in a climate-controlled office building would seem less fraught with danger. However, a surprising number of hazards can be present in an office setting. According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 80,410 private-industry office and administrative workers suffered on-the-job injuries in 2008. Many of these injuries could have been prevented had workers or supervisors recognized the risks and implemented simple workplace modifications to help mitigate them.

Here are 25 steps you can take to reduce the risk of injury among your office staff.


RUANSA ISO

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

A certificate is an instrument that adds credibility to your product or service. It’s a document that proves you’re capable of meeting the customer’s expectations. For most of the industries, certification is a contractual or a legal requirement. ISO itself does not perform certification; it is an organization that develops international standards like ISO 9001 and ISO 14001. Certification is performed by third party bodies and it’s up to your product or service to receive this credible certificate. In this article RUANSA will be giving you some details about the ISO certification process.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Ever imagined Sound Level Measuring using smartphones? Mobiles have evolved into computing machines with extraordinary capabilities. They have cameras, microphones, gyroscopes, proximity sensors, accelerometers, light sensors and GPS receivers. The advancement of these handheld devices has evolved into them being used as various instruments like torches, cameras and also sound measurement devices.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

by Alex Stadtner

What is the difference between Sick Building Syndrome and Building Related Illness?

Sick Building Syndrome and Building Related Illness are two distinct diagnosis. People often use the term “sick building” when referring to a property, but buildings don’t get sick – people do. I believe if there are numerous people suffering from Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) it’s okay to refer to the building as “sick,” but that’s technically inaccurate. So what is the difference between SBS and Building Related Illness (BRI)?


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Not too long ago I was involved in an accident investigation on a project at a very well-known international petrochemical company, where an employee from a civil construction company fractured two fingers. Needless to say it resulted in a Lost Time Incident.

 


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Article by Careerbuilder

It seems that every day we hear about a new form of technology created to save us time, boost our productivity, and maximize our performance at work. 

But, according to a new survey, the use of technology is actually one of the biggest productivity killers in the workplace.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Article by Personal Excellence.

“The trouble with not having a goal is that you can spend your life running up and down the field and never score.” – Bill Copeland

Do you set goals for yourself? What are your goals for the next 12 months? How about 3 years from now? 5 years? 10 years? What are your aspirations that you look toward coming true?


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

By Rudi Nieuwoudt

If I were asked to choose the most challenging task I've had to face throughout my entire working career I would have to say that effectively managing a team of people would be at the top. Management would be easy if everyone you managed were hard working, collaborative, and had a great attitude and exceptional talent. Unfortunately, this is not the case and to make things worse, many employees carry with them the ghosts of previous managers which places you in the position of having to prove yourself from the get go.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Article Written by Josh Cable

For years, stakeholders have been debating the best ways to implement a safety incentives program. Should the program be results-based or process-based? What should its objective be? What are appropriate prizes? What kind of return on their investment can companies expect?


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

HSE site induction…We’ve all done them right? Having a strong HSE induction program in place is one of the most important aspects of a successful HSE campaign. Unfortunately the reality is that many sites fail in properly inducting new employees resulting in them not being fully aware of what to expect on site, what the high risk activities are or even worse, what to do in case of emergency. Over years of both attending inductions as well as facilitating them I have identified a few aspects that are the biggest culprits responsible for the failure of induction programs.


User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

I’d bet that if you asked your employer’s directors how they measured the company’s performance they would mention things like profits, market share and return on investment. A common trait of these measurements would be that they are generally positive, reflecting achievements and not failures. Now I’d bet that if you asked the same people how they measured the company’s HSE performance the only measure that would be mentioned is incident statistics. While the general business performance of an organization is subject to a range of positive measures, for health and safety it too often comes down to measures of failures.